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Annual Reports

Find all of the Injury Control Council of WA’s (ICCWA) Annual Reports here.

ICCWA Annual Report 2015/2016

ICCWA Financial Report 2015/2016

ICCWA Annual Report 2014/2015

ICCWA Financial Report 2014/2015

ICCWA Annual Report 2013/2014

ICCWA Financial Report 2013/2014

ICCWA Annual Report 2012/2013

ICCWA Financial Report 2012/2013

ICCWA Annual Report 2011/2012

ICCWA Financial Report 2011/2012

ICCWA Annual Report 2010/2011

ICCWA Financial Report 2010/2011

ICCWA Annual Report 2009/2010

ICCWA Financial Report 2009/2010

ICCWA Annual Report 2008/2009

ICCWA Annual Report 2007/2008

ICCWA Annual Report 2006/2007

ICCWA Annual Report 2005/2006

ICCWA Annual Report 2004/2005

ICCWA Annual Report 2003/2004

ICCWA Annual Report 2002/2003

ICCWA Annual Report 2001/2002

ICCWA Annual Report 2000/2001

ICCWA Annual Report 1999/2000

ICCWA Annual Report 1998/1999

2017 Injury Prevention and Safety Promotion Awards – nominations open

Nominations are now open for the 2017 Injury Prevention and Safety Promotion Awards!

The awards recognise the action and excellence of those working to prevent injury and promote safety in Western Australia.

Applications are encouraged from those leading outstanding initiatives and programs across Western Australia in health, not-for-profit organisations, community groups, educational institutions, and the government sector.

Download the nomination package.

Burns Awareness Month – June

June is National Burns Awareness Month, and with the weather cooling down all over Australia, burns risks are increasing(1). Some 88% of minor burns occur at home(2), and in winter the culprits are usually related to hot drinks and foods, heaters, open fires, and other warming devices. Burns are the third highest cause of death in children under five, and preventable burns injuries cost the Australian community over $150 million per year.

It is vitally important to be aware of how to prevent and treat burns in the home should they occur. Below are some tips to avoid burns this winter:

Around the home

  • Have easily accessible fire extinguisher/blanket in the home
  • Install smoke alarms and maintain/replace batteries every winter
  • Teach your children basic kitchen, bathroom, electrical and fire safety
  • Block power points with safety plugs
  • Keep candles away from materials and never leave them unattended
  • Keep matches and lighters securely out of children’s reach
  • Use fire guards to shield children from falling against heaters/fireplaces
  • Use power boards instead of double adapters where possible
  • Always sit at least 1 metre from a heater when warming up
  • Air/dry clothing at least 1 metre from a heater
  • Regularly cleaning lint filters for clothes dryers
  • Never drink a hot cuppa while holding a baby or young child

In the kitchen

  • Keep kettles, jugs, teapots, appliance cords and saucepan handles away from the edge of surfaces
  • Install a barrier to keep out pets and Small children from the cooking area
  • Keep hot drinks out of children’s reach
  • Do not move pots of hot oil or water across the kitchen
  • Purchase and use oven mitts when handling hot trays/pots etc
  • Keep microwaves out of children’s reach but at adult chest height

In the bathroom

  • Lower the delivery temperature of hot water to 50C via a licensed plumber
  • Always supervise children in the bathroom
  • Turn the cold tap on first and off last
  • Check the bath water before placing a child in – if it is too hot for the inside of your wrist, it is too hot for a child
  • Unplug and store hair dryers, straighteners and curlers securely
  • Install grip bars and rubber mats in the shower/bath

Although we can attempt to prevent burns, they can still happen. From reducing pain to reducing future scarring, knowing how to treat a burn injury immediately and effectively when they occur can have a big impact on recovery outcomes for victims. While most burns injuries are preventable, they can still happen. Using the Remove-Cool-Cover approach is the best way to approach a burn injury.

  • Remove all jewellery from around the burn area. Remove any clothing around the burn area unless it is stuck to the skin.
  • Cool the burn under cool running water for 20 minutes. DO NOT use ice or creams as this can further damage the skin.
  • Cover the burn loosely with cling wrap or a clean, damp lint-free cloth.
  • Seek immediate medical advice if the burn is:
    • larger than a 20 cent coin
    • on the face, hands, groin or feet
    • deep or infected
    • caused by chemicals, electricity or if signs of inhalation injury (blackening around mouth or nostrils, swelling of airways) are evident

In an emergency call 000 or 112 if on a mobile if it is out of range or credit. For further medical information contact your local Burns Unit or hospital.

For more information on National Burns Awareness Month, and to download our Know Injury burns toolkit for your organisation, click here.


BRANZ Burns Registry of Australia and New Zealand, Annual Report, ANNUAL REPORT, 1st July 2013 –30th June 2014

Burns Awareness research – commissioned by Mundipharma Pty Limited  Conducted by Galkal, 22-29 May, 2015, national sample of 515 Australians aged 18 years and older (who had suffered a burn in last 6 months)

A Way Through – Kellerberrin (Health Workers)

Do you work with Aboriginal mob?

Do you want to learn tools to help deal with your own and your mobs hard times?

Over two days, A Way Through can help you to get stronger using art, music, dance and yarning. Shaun Nannup, a human being, an Indigenous man and a father, along with Ros Snyder will help you to understand the hard times, so you can keep on helping yourself and your mob.

Become strong in yourself, your culture and your family. Strong communities need strong connections and this starts with you.

Monday 12th and Tuesday 13th June 2017
9am – 4.30pm
FREE
The Prev
1 George Street, Kellerberrin WA 6410

Email training@iccwa.org.au

Call 08 9420 7212

Visit awaythroughhealthworker.eventbrite.com.au

A Way Through – Kellerberrin

Are you or your mob between 18 and 25?

Over two days, A Way Through can help you become strong in yourself, your culture and your family using art, music, dance and yarning. So you can stay strong during hard times.

Shaun Nannup, a human being, an Indigenous man and a father, along with Ros Snyder will help you understand the hard times, so you can keep on helping yourself and your mob.

Strong communities need strong connections and this starts with you.

Thursday 15th and Friday 16th June 2017
9am – 4.30pm
FREE
Noongar Centre Kellerberrin
Cnr Bedford & Leake Street, Kellerberrin WA 6410

Email training@iccwa.org.au

Call 08 9420 7212

Visit awaythrough.eventbrite.com.au

RTSWA joins the annual Blessing of the Roads

RTSWA acting manager, Ryan Fernie, joined the new WA Police and Road Safety Minister, the Hon Michelle Roberts MLA and Road Safety Commissioner Kim Papalia for the annual Blessing of the Roads in Mirrabooka this year. The event was jointly coordinated by the cities of Stirling, Swan and Joondalup and put the focus on road safety as we headed into traditionally one of the worst periods on our roads – the Easter long weekend. To read more please click here.

Road Safety Commissioner Kim Papalia lets regional and remote WA know that help is out there for those in need

Road Safety Commissioner Kim Papalia joined the Road Trauma Support team in Bunbury on Thursday May 9 for a specially tailored grief trauma and loss workshop for emergency services personnel in the region.

The day long session was designed to assist those on the front line both professionally and personally to support themselves and others when dealing with grief and trauma.

Mr Papalia introduced the session and spoke of his own experence as a police officer working in the field and the challenges that emergency services personnel face every day. To read more click here.

15th World Congress on Public Health

With the theme of Voices, Vision, Action, the 15th World Congress on Public Health in Melbourne, Australia (3-7 April 2017) saw a week of influential speakers come together from around the world with addresses from government representatives and ministers, panel discussions and research presentations, just to name a few.

The congress charged the attendees with taking the next steps to promote health within their own settings and pull from previous charters, such as the Ottawa Charter on Health Promotion 1, to build upon for future directives. Guided by the underlying foundation set out by the United Nation Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), the plenary presenters highlighted targets to improve health, protect the planet, end poverty and ensure equality for all.

Prominent topics from the Congress included climate change, gender and racial equality, Indigenous health and social corporate responsibility. The theme of injury remained as a secondary cause of poor health and was addressed within individual streams of oral research presentations, such as drowning, road trauma, violence against women and children, falls, and communities and environments.

However, it was disappointing to see that injury prevention was not a prominent area of focus for this Congress. Injury accounts for 10% of the global burden of disease2 and is the fourth most common cause of death and hospitalisation in Western Australia3, therefore more action is needed to pull injury to the forefront. Injury prevention is inherently interconnected with the SDGs and is recognised as one of the nine Health Priority Areas by the Australian Government4 , highlighting that communities and governments should continue to work together to mitigate risks associated with  injury.

On my personal reflections on the Congress, from the sustainable development goals, to passionate speakers on climate change, to improving health within Indigenous populations, one key thought kept coming into my mind: Solidarity. As discussed by Dr Bettina Borisch from the Institute of Global Health at the University of Geneva, solidarity is when ‘people can unite across our differences, not allowing themselves to be divided and conquered’. As health professionals, it is natural to become siloed within our professional focus, but as we all work to create a society where people live healthy and fulfilling lives, solidarity unites us to create a network that collaborates to take action. I found Dr Borisch’s call to solidarity really resonated with me and made me reflect on our current situation and to endeavour to work better in partnerships to promote health.

With the President of the World Federation of Public Health Associations Michael Moore stating ‘now is the time to take action’, take a moment to read, reflect and support The World Federation of Public Health Associations Demand for Action – Melbourne 2017 which can be found here.

Catrina Wold
Evidence and Practice Lead


1 World Health Organization. Ottawa Charter for Public Health [Internet]. World Health Organization; 1986. Available from: http://www.who.int/healthpromotion/conferences/previous/ottawa/en/

2 Haagsma JA, Graetz N, Bolliger I, Naghavi M, Higashi H, Mullany EC, et al. The global burden of injury: incidence, mortality, disability-adjusted life years and time trends from the Global Burden of Disease study 2013. Injury Prevention. 2016 Feb;22(1):3–18.

3 Ballestas T, Xiao J, McEvoy S, Somerford P. The Epidemiology of Injury In Western Australia, 2000 – 2008. Perth: Department of Health WA; 2011.

4 Australian Institute of Health and Wellness. National Health Priority Areas [Internet]. AIHW; 2017. Available from: http://aihw.gov.au/national-health-priority-areas/

Overview of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Status 2016

A recent release by Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet “Overview of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health status 2016” provides a comprehensive summary of the most recent indicators of the health and current health status of Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. This report outlines some key injury figures pertaining Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population.

In 2014 – 2015 there were 29,237 hospital separations for injuries for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. [1]

Falls (20%), assault (19%), exposure to mechanical forces (17%) and complications of medical and surgical care (14%) were the leading external causes of injury-related hospitalisations.1

Long-term conditions caused by injury were reported less frequently by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people than by non-Indigenous people. [2]

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 25 – 44 years of age experienced the highest proportion (%) of injury. [1]

The hospitalisation rates for injury for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people increased with remoteness from 38 per 1,000 in major cities to 74 per 1,000 in remote and very remote areas. [3]

After adjusting for age, the death rate from; assault was 8.2 times higher, land transport accidents 2.9 times higher and intentional self-harm 2 times higher for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people than for non-Indigenous people. [4]

Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet. Overview of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health status 2016 [Internet]. Australia Indigenous HealthInfoNet; 2017. Available from: http://www.healthinfonet.ecu.edu.au/health-facts/overviews/selected-health-conditions/injury


[1] Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (2016) Admitted patient care 2014-15: Australian hospital statistics. Canberra: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare

[2] Australian Bureau of Statistics (2014) Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health survey: first results, Australia, 2012-13: Table 6 [data cube]. Retrieved 26 March 2014

[3] Steering Committee for the Review of Government Service Provision (2016) Overcoming Indigenous disadvantage: key indicators 2016 report. Canberra: Productivity Commission

[4] Australian Bureau of Statistics (2016) Causes of Death, Australia, 2015. Retrieved 28 September 2016 from www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/abs@.nsf/Lookup/by%20Subject/3303.0~2015~Main%20Features~Summary%20of%20findings~1